Breaking

Post Top Ad

Your Ad Spot

Saturday, 7 March 2020

The First Technique: Learn to exercise your Memory

What happens if you don't exercise for some time? What if you were to sit on your coach all day long doing nothing but gorge on potato chips and watch TV? Of course you'd put on a lot of weight. But also you'd find that your muscles would tend to waste away. You'd lose strength, you'd lose coordination, you'd lose muscle function. Pretty soon you'd find yourself spending more and more time on the coach simply because it had become too difficult to leave it. Well, the memory works in a similar fashion: the more you use your memory to remember things, the more you gain a conscious control over the way the hippocampus works.
The First Technique: Learn to exercise your Memory
The First Technique: Learn to exercise your Memory

If you work very hard at remembering things, if you make remembering a habit, then you'll slowly find that as time goes on, you begin remembering better and better. Yes, memory works just the same way as your physical body does. If you just say: "Oh, I can't remember things", and then use your memory less and less, you'll find that your ability toremember things consciously decreases proportionally. As I mentioned in the introduction, it's all about hard work and the will to succeed. Of course there are all sorts of tricks to aid the memory, mnemonic devices that can help you to remember large lists, or many digit numbers.

But even these will be difficult to apply successfully to the different tasks that come up in life unless you give them a great deal of practice. You must seek out ways and places in which to practice your memory skills. You can practice them anywhere: at a bus stop waiting for a bus, on the way to work, during a walk in a park. Such regular practice will cause new pathways to form in your brain, and will greatly enhance your control over capabilities of your hippocampus. You see, the brain is a highly evolutionary device, it can react to and deal with almost any demand that is made upon it.

One thing you absolutely must not do is to use writing as a memory tool. This is really the first step to developing a good memory, and I cannot stress this enough. Try not to stick written notes onto your refrigerator or make similar notes of things to do and calls to make on your smartphone or computer, for example. The things with making notes in any form, whether written or digital, is that by doing so you place absolutely no demand on your brain to remember those things. As you use your memory less and less, your brain will less and less able to remember things, and you will pass your time in a vague sort of absentmindedness that can only be relieved by written notes.

This is no way to spend your life, and the best way to turn away from it is to rely on yourself and your mind and its powers and capabilities. As I've mentioned once or twice, I'll be teaching you several tricks to help you remember things. But just as with the notes there is such a thing as relying too much upon memory tricks. Ultimately the best possible thing is to gain such a conscious control over the hippocampus that you can remember anything that you wish to, purely at will. Of course, by all means use these memory tricks as a stop gap measure until your own mind evolves to enable you to remember things consciously and relatively effortlessly.

But at the same time do your best to use and to rely upon your own memory wherever possible, because this really is the only way in which you can train it to work at your will. There is another thing about memory that you should know. The way the human brain remembers things is that it forms distinctive pathways between neurons, and each distinctive pathway stands for a memory. The more times you think about something the more times the pathways that relate to that thought are activated. Each time a pathway in a neural way is activated, it becomes stronger, and the memories associated with it become more defined and easier to access.

What this means in simple terms is the more you think of something, and the more times you access your memory about that thing, the easier it becomes to remember it and the stronger and more defined the memory becomes. But more importantly, science has found that the more pathways your brain forms, the easier it becomes to form new pathways. Better still, those pathways form interconnected chains, a true web in which memories are linked to each other in intricate patterns, so that when you access a memory, you not only access that memory, but all sorts of memories that are linked to it. In other words, your entire brain and neural web become more efficient, allowing you to access all sorts of out of the way memories, and even things that you haven't remembered for years.

You can just imagine the kind of clear-sightedness and acuity of thought that you will develop if you work at exercising your mind the same way as you probably work at exercising your body. The opportunities for exercising your memory might be more prevalent than you think. For example, how many stairs are there leading up to the floor on which you live, or the floor at which you work at the office? What, you don't remember?

Consider that an opportunity to exercise your memory, and this can give you a small clue as to what number of opportunities for such exercise actually exist. You can hop onto a bus, for example, and give imaginary names to interesting passengers that you see. Try to remember the names of those passengers when they get off the bus. It's a simple exercise of memory, but it will help you to remember names and to relate those names to faces. You see, with the little imagination you can make the exercise of your memory both fun and enjoyable, and immensely profit from doing so as well.

No comments:

Post a comment

Post Top Ad

Your Ad Spot

Pages